In Search of Poetry Magic

Dear Dot,

Re: In Search of Poetry Magic

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I often find that, after a long period of writer’s block, the thing that makes it the most difficult to get back into writing is that language just doesn’t seem to do for me what it did when I was writing poetry fluently. I can’t seem to make it – or let it, indeed – do more than a simple job: tell a story, answer a question, describe something.

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Poetry Resolutions

Dear Dot,

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It’s the time for resolving. I’m going to reflect on those I made last year and see if I dare add more. First though, first, or last thing (essay fever), I found myself looking up “truth” and “belief” in the dictionary. The first is defined in terms of itself, the second of the first, with the addition that it involved feeling. Both are from the old English (I imagine their points being far better pointed out in a cuddly cave outfits, and rocky scene).

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A Toolbox

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Dear Dot,

Renga – I hope not too depleted after last week’s energised post; that  your return will be proof of the sustainability of collaboration – yes. It builds on things we’ve spoken about: the uses of form, the good in writing prompts, and of having a time-scaffolding when living in a world full of distractions.

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Recycling Biro Ink

Dear Dot,

While looking for writing exercises for an earlier post, I found this on the prompts page of The Journal:

‘As an exercise, write a solo “renga”. (Not to argue the authenticity of a renga being written by two poets – not one)’

I was intrigued by the idea of a poetic form that was inherently collaborative, and it got me thinking about how our relationship, poetry-wise, has changed since we left university. Exchanging letters on poetry with you each week has helped keep my poetic theory developing, and made me examine my own practice, as well as preserving our friendship. But I miss the simpler, more directly creative sharing of poems as we wrote them, which we have done so much less of since living further apart, and I think is harder to do across distance than discussing theory. So I’ve been thinking of some ways we could set up dialogues about and through actual poetry, rather than just theory; exercises that would allow our voices and imaginations to feed each other, as can those of a physically present group of poets. Starting with renga, we could:

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Putting the Stuffing back with the Poetry Method!

Dear Dot

  Putting the stuffing back with the poetry method! Just now, a poem came out, onto the paper, in the form of a step (to me it was in the form of a step…). It shan’t be shared: would not bear all of those megabytes for sure. It came a week after your challenge to write about what a poem should be, and days after learning about the psychology of motivation. So I’m interested to reflect on what motivated it.

This picture came up amongst many others, on googling “Ian Finaly” in Google Images.

visual poetry

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